Hawkshead Tourist Information

Hawkshead....the prettiest village in the lake district

Welcome to Hawkshead

The prettiest village set in the magnificent vale of Estwaite, In the heart of the English Lake District, Hawkshead is a truly historic and wonderfully picturesque village characterised by its cluster of whitewashed houses, archways and alleways, courtyards and squares. A prosperous mediaeval wool town, its rich history includes important connections with the poet William Wordsworth and children's story author Beatrix Potter.

Hawkshead has flourished since its beginnings as a medieval market town. Today, with its car-free village centre, it's the perfect place for the visitor to experience the 'real' Lake District. The cobbled streets, squares and courtyards and the beautiful whitewashed cottages, topped with local Lakeland slate, give this little place a magical feel.

The village is steeped in history and heritage, from the ruins of Hawkshead Hall (built by medieval monks) and the 15th-century St Michael's parish church and court house, to later buildings such as the grammar school (1855) which the poet William Wordsworth attended. There is also a Beatrix Potter gallery – Hawkshead is only 3.2 km from Hill Top at Near Sawrey where the author wrote many of her books. Keen shoppers will find a range of goods for sale, from souvenirs to climbing and walking paraphernalia.

The surrounding scenery is some of the finest in the Lake District with Grizedale Forest to the south, Lake Windermere to the east and Lake Coniston to the west, as well as the fine moorland encircling much of the area around Hawkshead.

What's On in Hawkshead

Latest events in Hawkshead are as follows.

Church

 

The church of St Michael, which overlooks the village, has an interesting 16th Century altar tomb. It also has illustrated versions of some of the psalms and other quotations painted on the walls during the 17th and 18th Centuries.

There are whitewashed cottage around the central square of the village, and a number of narrow cobbled alleys and archways running between the various properties. The lack of street signs can be rather confusing and it is advisable to call at the local Tourist Information to obtain a guide. The main car park is a short distance outside the village and no traffic is allowed in the centre.

Many of the buildings have decorative features, ranging from pretty window boxes to carved gargoyles in the eaves of some of the cottages. On the main street is the Beatrix Potter Gallery, displaying art work by the author in the former office of her solicitor husband, William Heelis. The old Quaker Meeting House was built in 1688 and is one of the oldest buildings in the village. A 15th Century building on Flag Street is now a café.
There are several cafés in the village which are opened during the daytime in the tourist season. The public houses serve food and there are several shops in the village. Each August Hawkshead holds an agricultural show.

Please mention Hawkshead tourist information Website when making a booking

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HAWKSHEAD COAT OF ARMS

Hawkshead review 

I love Hawkshead and think it's a great place to visit. The Lake District can often be wet and Hawkshead offers interesting places to visit whilst keeping dry! It does get very busy in the high season so arrive early to beat the crowds. If you are visiting the lake District then make time to visit Hawkshead, I'm sure you won't be disappointed! 

 

Beyond Hawkshead.
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There are some great walks from Hawkshead. My favourite is to Tarn Hows, a large expanse of water surrounding by mountains and woods. If you fancy this walk then be aware it is a long walk and you will need good footwear, water and food. The weather in the Lake District can change quickly so be prepared and take waterproof clothing

Flowers

 

Hawkshead Hall is on the Coniston road from the    village.

It was built during the reign of Henry III by the monks of Furness Abbey. Most of the Hall was destroyed during the reformation but the 15th Century Courthouse is one of the oldest remaining buildings and contains the Museum of Rural Life. The site is now a National Trust property.

Esthwaite Water is a Narrow   strip of water, about two miles long and emptying into Windermere. It is a popular spot for trout fishing. The lovely beauty spot of Tarn Hows is a pleasant walk from Hawkshead, offering views of Helvellyn and the fells around Coniston.

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HAWKSHEAD PRIVATE

HIRE TAXIS FROM THE

CENTRE OF THE LAKES

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FOR THE BEST PLACES TO STAY AND EAT IN THE LAKES GIVE US A CALL

F1

FANTASTIC FOOD

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GREAT STYLE

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MOUTH WATERING DESSERTS

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GREAT WINES

LATEST NEWS IN HAWKSHEAD

Champion Golden Ale of Britain

Cumbrian Legendary Ales has won a top award for its famous Loweswater Gold beer. The beer has been judged Champion Golden Ale of Britain.

Competing at Earls Court, London, the outstanding beer brewed in the Lakes at Esthwaite was judged by a panel to be the top Golden Ale. The event was organised by CAMRA (Campaign for Real Ale) and involved a rigorous selection process through local, regional and finally national stages. Expert judges selected Loweswater Gold in a careful blind tasting. Interest in real ale has blossomed in recent years and there are now around 800 breweries in the UK.

Speaking after the announcement brewery owner Roger Humphreys said,

“This is one of the most prestigious beer competitions in the world. We are thrilled for the whole team who have worked so hard and the award is a tribute to them all, including Hayley Barton the Head Brewer. Special mention should also be made of Matt Webster, the original brewer when the beer was first developed in Loweswater.”

 
The new Mini Bus is Here 8 seater

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Miss Potter’ may continue to impact again this year upon visitors to Hill Top in near Sawrey and Beatrix Potter Gallery in Hawkshead. The National Trust is expecting an increase in Japanese visitors, following the release of the film there last Autumn. This year both premises are going to open every day except Friday, in order to try and spread the load on the houses themselves, the local area and staff/volunteers. The National Trust are also looking for volunteers to assist in the work they do – contact Cath (36269) for HillTop and Paul (47997) for the countryside.

accommodation deals available

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The centre of Hawkshead is closed to cars which enhances its haracter and makes wandering around its narrow streets specially rewarding. The surrounding countryside promises any delightful walks from gentle strolls to rugged hill climbing, and some excellent fishing

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